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Degrees and Radians [Solved!]

My question

How is the sine of sixty degrees a negative number in radians?

Relevant page

4. Integration: Basic Trigonometric Forms

What I've done so far

When I enter sin 60 into my calculator in degrees the result returned is .866.

When I enter sin 60 in radians the result is -.3048.

X

How is the sine of sixty degrees a negative number in radians?
Relevant page

<a href="https://www.intmath.com/methods-integration/4-integration-trigonometric-forms.php">4. Integration: Basic Trigonometric Forms</a>

What I've done so far

When I enter sin 60 into my calculator in degrees the result returned is .866.  

When I enter sin 60 in radians the result is -.3048.

Re: Degrees and Radians

@Phinah

Using the conversion `pi` radians `= 180^@`, we have:

`1` radian `= (180^@)/pi`

`60` radians `= (60 xx 180^@)/pi`

Multiply this out and then convert it to an "ordinary" angle less than `360°`

Can you see why `sin 60` radians is negative now?

X

@Phinah

Using the conversion `pi` radians `= 180^@`, we have:

`1` radian `= (180^@)/pi`

`60` radians `= (60 xx 180^@)/pi`

Multiply this out and then convert it to an "ordinary" angle less than `360°`

Can you see why `sin 60` radians is negative now?

Re: Degrees and Radians

NOW I CAN, thanks to you.

The answer is 3438`^@` rounded. Divided by 360`^@` shows that it is 9.55 complete revolutions which has a terminal side of around 198`^@`. Sine in the third quadrant is negative so this angle has a value of -.301.

Numbers have been rounded.

X

NOW I CAN, thanks to you.

The answer is 3438`^@` rounded.  Divided by 360`^@` shows that it is 9.55 complete revolutions which has a terminal side of around 198`^@`. Sine in the third quadrant is negative so this angle has a value of -.301.

Numbers have been rounded.

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