Skip to main content
Search IntMath
Close

450+ Math Lessons written by Math Professors and Teachers

5 Million+ Students Helped Each Year

1200+ Articles Written by Math Educators and Enthusiasts

Simplifying and Teaching Math for Over 23 Years

Tips, tricks, lessons, and tutoring to help reduce test anxiety and move to the top of the class.

 What is a Nonagon?

A nonagon, also known as an enneagon, is a nine-sided polygon in Euclidean geometry. It has nine interior angles and nine sides that are all the same length. Nonagons can be convex or concave, and they can appear in different shapes depending on their angle measurements. Let’s take a look at the properties of a nonagon and how they are used in geometry. 

 

Properties of a Nonagon 

A nonagon’s nine interior angles all add up to 1260°, and each individual angle measures 140°. These angle measurements mean that two adjacent sides meet at an obtuse angle (140°), while the remaining seven sides meet at an acute angle (70°). As previously mentioned, it can be either convex or concave depending on which type of angles it has; if the angles are all acute, then the nonagon will be convex; if any one of them is obtuse or right-angled, then it will be concave. 

 

Uses in Geometry 

Nonagons are used in various areas of geometry. They are often used when solving problems related to area and perimeter. For example, when calculating the area of a nonagon you must calculate the area of each triangle inside the shape and then add them together to get the total area of the nonagon itself. Similarly, when calculating its perimeter you must find out how long each side is and then add them together to get its total perimeter size.  

 

Nonagons can also be found in other areas such as trigonometry and calculus as well as more advanced topics like coordinate geometry or graph theory. In addition, they can also help students understand basic concepts like symmetry, transformations, congruency, similarity, lines/segments/rays, etc.

 

Conclusion

In conclusion, a nonagon is an important geometric shape with many applications across multiple disciplines of mathematics including trigonometry, calculus, and coordinate geometry – just to name a few! It has nine interior angles that all add up to 1260 degrees and its sides always have equal lengths regardless if it's convex or concave. Understanding how these shape works are essential for students looking to develop their knowledge in math-related fields so they may apply what they learn later on in their studies.

 

 

FAQ

 

What is the definition of nonagon in geometry?

A nonagon, also known as an enneagon, is a nine-sided polygon in Euclidean geometry. It has nine interior angles and nine sides that are all the same length. Nonagons can be convex or concave, and they can appear in different shapes depending on their angle measurements.

What is an example of a nonagon?

A nonagon can be seen in platonic solids, such as the cube and dodecahedron. It is also found in many architectural designs, like the Great Mosque of Kairouan or the Alhambra Palace.

What are the properties of a nonagon?

A nonagon’s nine interior angles all add up to 1260°, and each individual angle measures 140°. These angle measurements mean that two adjacent sides meet at an obtuse angle (140°), while the remaining seven sides meet at an acute angle (70°). As previously mentioned, it can be either convex or concave depending on which type of angles it has.

What does a nonagon look like in math?

In math, a nonagon can be represented as nine points connected together in the shape of a polygon. Each point represents one side of the nonagon, and the lines connecting them represent its angles.

 

 

24x7 Tutor Chat

Tips, tricks, lessons, and tutoring to help reduce test anxiety and move to the top of the class.