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Domain and range [Solved!]

My question

you didn't tell how to find domain and ravge of a given function. tell me varies types to find domain and range of a given function.
thank you

Relevant page

4a. Domain and Range of a Function

What I've done so far

Tried to apply it to my function

X

you didn't tell how to find  domain and ravge of a given function. tell me varies types to find domain and range of  a given function.
thank you
Relevant page

<a href="/functions-and-graphs/2a-domain-and-range.php">4a. Domain and Range of a Function</a>

What I've done so far

Tried to apply it to my function

Re: Domain and range

Hi Shaikshavali

There are 5 examples on the page you came from (4a. Domain and Range of a Function) indicating how you find the domain and range of a function.

For domain, you need to decide which `x` values are allowed (these form the domain) and not allowed (these are not part of the domain).

For range, you need to figure out the resulting `y` values that you get by substituting all the possible x values in to the function.

A diagram is given for each one to illustrate what the answer means.

There is no formula that you can apply for different functions. You need to go through this process for each function that you are examining.

The usual questions for this involve square roots (so you need to make sure what is under the square root is positive) or fractions (you need to make sure that the bottom of the fraction is not 0.

I hope that helps.

Let me know if you need more help with a specific question.

X

Hi Shaikshavali

There are 5 examples on the page you came from (<a href="/functions-and-graphs/2a-domain-and-range.php">4a. Domain and Range of a Function</a>) indicating how you find the domain and range of a function.

For <b>domain</b>, you need to decide which `x` values are allowed (these form the domain) and not allowed (these are not part of the domain).

For <b>range</b>, you need to figure out the resulting `y` values that you get by substituting all the possible x values in to the function.

A diagram is given for each one to illustrate what the answer means.

There is no formula that you can apply for different functions. You need to go through this process for each function that you are examining.

The usual questions for this involve square roots (so you need to make sure what is under the square root is positive) or fractions (you need to make sure that the bottom of the fraction is not 0.

I hope that helps.

Let me know if you need more help with a specific question.

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