IE transparent image problems

By Murray Bourne, 31 Dec 2005

A user of my Interactive Mathematics site wrote saying she couldn't see some of the images. When I checked (using Firefox), there was no problem. Then it dawned - it may be yet another problem with IE. Sure enough, IE was not displaying about 1/4 of the images properly. It was showing a "broken image" icon (red cross) but the image was certainly on the server.

Anyway, after some experimenting, it appears that the transparent images (and that was most of them) had the problem. So I used Macromedia Firework's excellent batch processing capability to change all the images to be non-transparent. It took about 10 hours to process and upload them all, but it worked like a charm.

Here is one of those images (If you see the same image twice, it is because you are using Firefox, Opera or Netscape. In IE, this will show a broken image symbol):

math image - does not show in IE

Here is what it looks like after the processing (all browsers should see this okay):

Math image - okay in IE
The mystery is... why did this problem appear just in the last week or so? Why wasn't it there before? Did it happen as a result of one of the Windows patches that Micro$oft released around a weeek ago? Anyone else had a problem with this?

For users of Interactive Mathematics: If you are using IE and you still cannot see some images, please Refresh the page. That should remove the old images from your cache.

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